“Moments of sheer terror; then hours of boredom”
Feb07

“Moments of sheer terror; then hours of boredom”

Sat across from Denis Sutton, in his quaint little ‘mancave’, as he calls it, at the back of his charming Tavistock home, you’d find it difficult to believe that he had once been at the heart of one of the most imposing prisons in the country. For almost four decades, as well. During his time serving in the British Prison Service, the inmates he had to oversee is a ‘who’s who’ of British crime history. Men like Frank Mitchell, Jack...

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Hatherleigh’s ‘Hairy Vicar’ Uncovered
Jan28

Hatherleigh’s ‘Hairy Vicar’ Uncovered

By Peter Embling Leigh Winsbury arrived in Hatherleigh with his wife Lynn, about a year ago as our new vicar. He arrived to great excitement and not a little apprehension. Who would they send us? What would they be like? Well, he didn’t disappoint. This huge stack of hair with a man underneath arrived to look after: Meeth, Jacobstowe, Northlew, Exbourne, and Hatherleigh. The buzz around the villages soon gathered momentum: he’s got...

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Histories and Mysteries: Devon and the English Civil War
Jan27

Histories and Mysteries: Devon and the English Civil War

This month marks 371 years since the execution of King Charles I. He met the executioner’s axe on the 30th January, 1649, outside Banqueting House in London. This followed years of war with his fellow countrymen. However, what people tend to forget is that Devon actually played a fundamental part during the English Civil War (1642-1651), as one of the key battlegrounds during the war between the King and Parliament. The war began as a...

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The Big Picture
Jan17

The Big Picture

A stunning photgraph sent in by Beth Spence of the walk around the river Teign.

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Histories & Mysteries – The Last Battle of The Revenge
Jan15

Histories & Mysteries – The Last Battle of The Revenge

Devon’s own Sir Richard Grenville, (born June 15, 1542—died September, 1591), may not be as well-known as his contemporaries Sir Francis Drake or Sir Walter Raleigh. However, his exploits at sea are no less colourful, daring and interesting. In his early career, he found himself in the midst of the imperial army fighting against the Turks in Hungary (1566–68). Shortly after he was in Ireland, suppressing an uprising in Munster in...

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Music’s loss was politics’ gain
Jan08

Music’s loss was politics’ gain

On a May morning in 1997, an overnight revolution had occurred. Tony Blair walked up to the steps of Downing Street having swept to a landslide victory, heaving the Conservatives out of power after 18 years. Indeed, in Blair’s own words, a ‘new dawn’ had broken. This ‘New Labour’ government could easily be argued to stand alongside Attlee’s in 1945-1951 and Thatcher’s 1979-1990, as being one of the most radical in British postwar...

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